Family watching TV and eating popcorn

DIRECTV NOW’s DVR Beta Is Getting Close to Completion


It looks like AT&T is getting close to finishing testing their DIRECTV NOW beta app with DVR support. According to multiple sources and an update to the beta FAQ, the beta test is getting ready to wrap up.

Recently AT&T updated the beta FAQ page on their site with new details. From the update, it looks like they are done adding new devices to the beta. In a statement on the FAQ they say, “Only the devices listed above will be available for beta testing, no new devices will be added.”

Here are the devices they list as supported for the DVR beta:

  • iPhone/iPad (iOS 10)
  • Android Phone/Tablet (KitKat version 4.4 and above)
  • Web (Chrome browser only)
  • Apple TV (4th generation)
  • Amazon Fire TV/Stick (2nd generation and above)
  • Chromecast

According to this report and other sources, AT&T is getting close to finishing the public part of their beta. They still list the DIRECTV NOW DVR as likely coming out in the fall of 2017, but it could be delayed. As always with technology, there are unexpected bumps in the road.

There was even a report that the DVR may be delayed until early 2018, but at this time that has not been confirmed. The good news is it looks like their beta test before the public release is starting to wind down as they get ready to go public.

That does leave one glaring omission: the Roku streaming player. It is possible that AT&T still plans to roll out a Roku channel, but it is starting to look far less likely to be in the first wave of players.

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  • Andrew Lindeman

    Interesting that they’ve had several Roku promotions and it’s not on the list of supported devices! Yet Amazon Fire stick is supported.

    • Ja Cam

      I thought the same thing. AND Roku is more popular than any other streaming player so you’d inconvenience less people doing Roku first. You’d think it would have more priority over Amazon Fire…nothing against the Fire TV, I have both.

    • Kevin Beekman

      I believe the problem about the Roku is that it is its own operating system and language. There was a delay with the app, and there is a delay with DVR functionality.

      • Tex0322

        iOS is the same way.

        • crawdad62

          Lot more incentive to develop for iOS though. While Roku has a large STB share it’s dwarfed by iOS and Android.

    • Jim
    • John Moody

      It’s been on Roku for while now.

  • GMan524

    Not having Roku is their loss.

  • Thomas Hessel

    No Roku = boo.

  • Ja Cam

    Seems like they should have done it first for the devices they’ve had promo’s for… Apple TV & ROKU, rather than Apple TV & AMAZON. Especially since they have a DirectvNOW shortcut button on the new Roku streaming sticks. Or did it for the big screen devices first, then the dang cel phones…

    • mnsportsgeek

      Roku was one of the last things they had a promo for. Apple TV and Fire TV Stick had promos very early on.

      • Ja Cam

        You’re right, I forgot about the firestick promo… still, the # of people with a Roku is more but hopefully it won’t take too much longer than the others.

  • David Sosa

    I have Firetv so I’m covered but it seems Roku is the last one to get services as well as features. Firetv has the advantage of being a device that is open sourced..can install kodi and other services form 3rd party apps.

  • David Sosa

    Do you know if Android TV will have it? I can cast my iphone to my TV without issues as if I had a chromecast device.

  • Kal

    I don’t get why so many of these OTT companies are so slow with Roku. Is it more technically challenging or something? (I’m frustrated that YouTube doesn’t have Roku, either.)

    • PaperCoyote

      There are a couple of reasons. Yes Roku is a pain to program for. tvOS, FireOS, Android and just about everything else is easier. Also It makes sense for these companies to roll out a new product/feature on devices with less users as to not tax the network during the first few weeks or months. It allows them to also work out bugs and see where weak spots are and make adjustments before they get flooded with new customers when they add Roku support.

      That being said, If Roku would drop Brighthouse and switch to C++ or Java or anything more common then the apps would come quicker and perform better.

      • Kal

        Interesting. Thanks for the info!

      • Nathan John Ganiere

        FireOS is pretty much a customized version of Android, in fact some of the apps got the same version numbers, probably the exact same ones………

        • Nathan John Ganiere

          only difference might be some are signed with the Amazon Store marketplace………

          • PaperCoyote

            Yeah FireOS is a forked Android so they use Java too. That is why they get apps fast and you can even sideload apps to FireOS from Android (and vise versa). I haven’t had any problematic apps on the Fire TV STB. I know the stick can be under-powered for some apps but the box has always worked well.

  • filmex

    DTVN’s DVR is as close to completion as I am in getting that first date with Gal Gadot.

  • Jon Schumacher

    It’s a beta. They will probably have Roku support. They are not adding any more devices to the beta. Look at iOS for example no iOS 11 beta just iOS 10. If the beta is ending They are not putting resources into expanding it.

  • Angela Lucas Lechleiter

    Since my promotion with DTVN was with a Roku, I am going to be one very angry customer if Roku isn’t included. The only reason I got a Roku was because it was a promotional item with the DTVN service – I assumed, therefore, that it was the preferred device. After that, I bought a second Roku with the same idea.

    • The first device that DIRECTV NOW supported was Apple TV, followed by Fire TV.

      A Roku app, although much anticipated, only came at the end of May.

  • Roku is programmed in BrightScript (which I’m guessing you, like me, have probably never heard of before). Compare that to the programming languages for other devices like Objective-C on iOS, Java on Android, and C++ and C# for Xbox One and PlayStation 4 and its not terribly difficult to see that its much easier to find skilled developers for them vs Roku.

    • Malignar

      If Att doesn’t have the resources to find devs for the number 1 device, that is their problem and will be their loss.

  • Malignar

    Well at least there is no contract. I was suckered into paying two months up front for a useless device (roku). After that is up I will be forced to head to Vue.

  • AJ2

    Is the DVR going to be an extra charge or included in the package? . DVR is the one major thing that’s missing

  • mnsportsgeek

    I just got added to the beta today, so it doesn’t sound like it’s wrapping up anytime soon.

    • Are you going to partake? If so, which device? If Apple TV please hit me back as to whether or not the swipe channel change is still present. Hopefully not. It’s my #1 pet peave with the service.

  • crawdad62

    What “other sources.” Man! Project much? If they’re close to wrapping the beta up there’s going to be a lot of unhappy people.

  • REM

    Fire stick is a better option than Roku. You have Netflix and you can easily upload Kodi platform for every possible show.

    I also have the best media player period, the Nvidia Shield that has a built in Chromecast that I cast to from my Android DTVN app.

  • John Moody

    Roku has had the directive now app for quite a while. Whoever half asus wrote this article needs to learn to do basic research before writing an article. Good grief..

    • Jason McCawley

      Its for DVR support not general compatibility. Maybe read the article next time?

      • John Moody

        nope. article said no app. derp.