Burn

How to Save Money on Your Internet Bill


I get asked all the time how you can lower your Internet bill. I have a few tricks that I find help us save money on our home Internet.

#1 Shop Around

Shopping around is most important when you are looking at downgrading from a bundle to Internet only. Cable companies especially seem to hate giving any type of discount to someone who wants to downgrade. For example, my local cable company will charge a new customer $29.99 for 100 Mbps down, but customers who downgrade to the same plan pay more than double that: $70 a month.

Take some time, do some research, and do not discount DSL. I often switch between DSL and cable TV. You may be surprised to see AT&T DSL in some areas even offers a 1 Gbps option and 100 down DSL is more common than you may think. Don’t want to go with AT&T or CenturyLink? Look into some of the smaller DSL companies such as Toast.net.

#2 Lower Your Speed

Often when people become cord cutters Internet service providers try to talk them into crazy high Internet speeds.

I cut the cord with just 10 down and later found that about 20 to 25 Mbps down is all you need. Once you get over 100 down it has little effect on streaming.

Here is what Sling TV says you need for Internet speeds to stream Sling TV. The following are the recommended speeds according to Sling TV’s Help Center:

  • Constant speed of 3.0 Megabits per second or more: Streaming video content on portable devices such as tablets and phones.
  • Constant speed of 5.0 Megabits per second or more: Single stream of video content on a TV, PC, or Mac.
  • Constant speed of 25 Megabits per second or more: Recommended for households that maintain Internet use on multiple devices.

Still struggling with buffering and have more than that? Check out our guide to fixing buffering.

#3 Buy a Modem

Most ISPs charge $10 or more a month to rent their modems; however, many, such as Comcast, will let you buy a modem from them and save $120 a year. This is a great deal when you consider that most modems cost less than $100 and you can start saving money the first year.

If you rent a modem for three years that will cost you $360. If you buy a $100 modem it would still save you $260.

Do you have a tip for saving money on home Internet? Leve us a comment and let us know what it is.

Please follow us on Facebook and Twitter for more news, tips, and reviews.

Need cord cutting tech support? Join our new Cord Cutting Tech Support Facebook Group for help.

  • Andrew Lindeman

    You have to be lucky enough to live in an area with multiple providers- and you must be willing to switch.

    I was a 20 year + Comcast subscriber. I also have Verizon Fios in my town. Comcast kept raising my prices roughly $8 per year- this year it reached $185 and I don’t even have any of the premium movie channels. It was like being a frog in a water that is being heated to a boil. It finally hurt! So in March I switched to Fios. With no contract my bill went down to $115. It would have gone even lower had I agreed to a contract but I wanted to go OTT.

    I just switched to DirectTV Now and called Verizon to drop to Internet only service. Both Comcast and Verizon advertise $39 Internet- but only for new customers. Verizon will won’t give me that price- only $85 for contract-less Internet. So- back to Comcast I go!

    At this point I now have both Comcast’s coax and Verizon’s fiber cables into my house, and it will be dead simple to switch back and forth. And so I shall!

  • FranchisePlayer

    A link to your guide to fixing buffering in the article would be helpful.

    If you go with your 2nd option, it might also help to see if you can cut back on the devices you have in your house that need Internet access or switch off Wifi when not in use. Larger households with 4+ phones, tablets, PCs and other devices connected to the Internet might create a need for 50+ Mb. If multiple family members are all streaming something different, especially if there’s 4K content, 100 might be a safe bet.

    Fortunately, Google Fiber is coming to my neighborhood so I’ll be getting over 3X my current speed at a savings of around $30/month.

    • icwhatudidthere

      Yeah this. Cutting the cord in a multi-person household means you will need to account for the additional bandwidth needed for the streaming services replacing the cable boxes.

  • Jack J.

    You can buy your own modem for a lot less than $100. I picked up a refurbished one identical to the one I had from Time Warner/Spectrum by shopping ebay. It was easy to set up with the cable company, and it has worked just fine for two years now. All I pay is $39 a month for around 20 mbps. I get all of the cable TV programming I want for free by searching for the individual cable shows streamed on internet (both live and/or next day), plus I get about 25 local channels and their subchannels via indoor antenna ($25 one time).