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Amazon Denies They Are Building a Free Ad-Supported Streaming Service

This week AdAge reported that they had multiple sources claiming that Amazon was working on a free ad-supported version of Prime Video.

Now Amazon has come out to deny the report with a strongly worded email to news organizations: “We have no plans to create a free, ad-supported version of Prime Video.”

The report had claimed that Amazon wanted to go after services such as TubiTV, Crackle, Vudu, Pluto TV, and the new Roku Channel that all offer free streaming, but it seems that Amazon has no interest in such services.

We do know Amazon is selling ads to fill network spots on their Thursday Night NFL Football games. Yet according to Amazon they have no plans to sell ads for their on-demand content.

So it looks like the long-rumored free streaming service from Amazon is just that: a rumor. Maybe someday they will launch a free service but for now, it looks increasingly unlikely.

Source: B&C 

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4 Responses to Amazon Denies They Are Building a Free Ad-Supported Streaming Service

  1. Avatar
    Clark Bowman November 15, 2017 at 11:52 am #

    “Yet at this time all Amazon is doing is filling the ad breaks of every provider has the opportunity to sell ads for not adding additional ad blocks to their streams.”

    I have no idea what that sentence means.

  2. Avatar
    James Updike November 15, 2017 at 1:34 pm #

    Amazon’s whole reason for Prime Video is really to get people to become Prime Members because Prime members buy more stuff. A non-member version would go against their whole business model.

    • Avatar
      Marc H November 16, 2017 at 2:58 am #

      I agree, u do this to draw traffic, they have plenty.

  3. Avatar
    vrm November 16, 2017 at 12:55 pm #

    I don’t understand why they don’t offer viewers choice- free ads version of service together with paid versions of the service with various levels of ads.