SpeedMar2015

Average United States Download Speed Jumps 10Mbps in Just One Year to 33.9Mbps

SpeedMar2015

The most recent average US download speed from Ookla Speedtest for March 2014, is 33.9Mbps (these numbers are Broadband only, no Mobile tests are included).  In April 2014, the average speed was just 23.9Mbps. This jump in speed moves the United States to 27th in average download speed out of 199 counties; globally the average download speed is 22.3Mbps.

The US, often considered behind in internet speed, is now pulling ahead of several major countries such as: United Kingdom 30.18Mbps, Germany 29.95Mbps, Spain 28.28Mbps, Russia 27.7Mbps and Ireland 27.29Mbps.  However, the US at 27th out of 199 countries is still well behind countries such as South Korea 84.31Mbps and Japan 60.49Mbps.

Much of the growth has come in new areas of the US. In October 2014, Washington was not even in the top 10 states for download speed, and now has the fastest average speed. Additionally, North Dakota and Utah joined Washington in the top 10 fastest states.

The top ten states for average internet speeds in March 2015:

  1. Washington 45.6Mbps
  2. Missouri 41.21Mbps
  3. New York 40.86Mbps
  4. California 40.8Mbps
  5. Utah 40.47Mbps
  6. Delaware 40.03Mbps
  7. Rhode Island 39.76Mbps
  8. New Jersey 39.28Mbps
  9. Massachusetts 38.57Mbps
  10. North Dakota 37.84Mbps

The top ten states for average internet speeds in October 2014 were:

  1. New York 39.24Mbps
  2. Delaware 38.92Mbps
  3. New Jersey 38.86Mbps
  4. Maryland 36.92Mbps
  5. Missouri 36.62Mbps
  6. California 35.36Mbps
  7. Rhode Island 35.24Mbps
  8. Virginia 35.09Mbps
  9. Massachusetts 34.90Mbps
  10. Nevada 34.55Mbps

Top 5 cities with the fastest average speed in March 2015:

  1. Kansas City, MO 96.66Mbps
  2. Austin, TX 74.65Mbps
  3. Huntington Beach, CA 58.2Mbps
  4. New York, NY 53.3Mbps
  5. North Hollywood, CA 53.04Mbps

The top 5 cities with the fastest average speed in October 2014 were:

  1. Kansas City, MO 68.59Mbps
  2. Austin, TX 68.27Mbps
  3. Huntington Beach, CA 50.52Mbps
  4. Flushing, NY 49.83Mbps
  5. New York, NY 48.24Mbps

The top 5 major ISPs in the US in March 2015 are (note: Ookla did not include Google Fiber in this list):

  1. Verizon FiOS 43.2Mbps
  2. Comcast 42.7Mbps
  3. Cox 41.75Mbps
  4. Time Warner Cable 40.35Mbps
  5. Charter Communications 39.7Mbps

The top 5 major ISPs in the US in 2014 were:

  1. Google Fiber 230.69Mbps
  2. Verizon FIOS 42.27Mbps
  3. Cox 39.42Mbps
  4. Comcast 38.70Mbps
  5. Charter Communications 38.45Mbps

Clearly, ISPs are putting a lot of work into improving their services both on the backbone and at the last mile. As more and more Americans move to cut the cord and get their TV online, a faster internet is needed. Hopefully, these numbers continue to improve and will soon bring additional options to cord cutting Americans.

These numbers are the average from millions of tests run on Ookla websites in the last 30 days. The numbers are limited to tests that take place within 300 miles of the client and the host.  You can view the speed test results here.

More about the numbers in this report from Ookla.

An index is traditionally defined as a numerical scale used to compare variables with one another or with some reference number. For purposes of the NetIndex, Ookla defines an index as a weighted average of data collected over the 30 most recent days.

To calculate an index, Ookla first ensures that distance and infrastructure bottlenecks have a minimal impact on accuracy. To do this, we track the distance between the test location and the Ookla Speedtest server. Thanks to the breadth of our infrastructure, we have a server within 300 miles for the vast majority of the world population.

To determine the averages for broadband download and upload, we first average one hour’s worth of test results for each unique IP to get the IP Averages. Next, we average all of the IP Averages for one hour to determine the Hourly Average. From there, we average all of the Hourly Averages for one day to find the Daily Average. Finally, we average all of the Daily Averages for up to 30 days to get the final value.

With mobile download and upload, the averages are based on one day’s worth of tests from each device to first determine the Device Averages, which is then averaged to determine the Daily Average. We then average the Daily Averages for up to 30 days to determine the final value.

Nightly, we review 24-hour increments until we identify 30 days of data with acceptable parameters. To ensure the index value is current, we do not go back further than six months to find those 30 days of data used to compute the final index value. We ignore days where the average distance is more than 300 miles to ensure events, such as server downtime, do not affect the aggregated number.

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8 Responses to Average United States Download Speed Jumps 10Mbps in Just One Year to 33.9Mbps

  1. Avatar
    Stephen Green March 23, 2015 at 9:09 am #

    It’s about time,!

  2. Avatar
    Jeff March 23, 2015 at 12:14 pm #

    Why do I suspect that providers are giving speed testing services preference to traffic? The major carriers can’t have increased service by 50% in a year unless they’ve made massive investments…and by their balance sheets they haven’t.

    • Avatar
      Ryan March 23, 2015 at 12:24 pm #

      You are assuming they have been operating at their maximum capacity. They have everything throttled down. Also this article doesn’t take into account which plan’s people have, unless they are averaging them just for the sake of the average experience.

      • Avatar
        Admin March 23, 2015 at 12:29 pm #

        This is a average of all speed tests for a state. (At the bottom of the post is the full details.)

  3. Avatar
    Costin March 23, 2015 at 12:17 pm #

    And i’m just here in Romania paying 15$ for 1gb’s internet 😐 I understand infrastructure is expensive but if Romania can do is surely the bigger states in the US can do it at least at a more reasonable rate

  4. Avatar
    Wayne March 23, 2015 at 1:37 pm #

    They should really keep Google fiber on the list to show just how sad our cable companies are in providing speed. These speeds they’re showing off are their most expensive which barely anyone has. I’ve never seen above 15 Mbps and I’m paying close to $100 for crap. The U.S. Is a joke when it comes to Internet.

    • Avatar
      Andy March 25, 2015 at 5:00 am #

      $100 for 15 Mbps??? Must be in some remote area. Comcast has been offering $90 for 150 Mbps for quite some time now. They also have $65 for 105 Mbps.
      Charter has a $40 for a 60 Mbps plan
      I do not recall using a 15 Mbps since the past 4-5 years

    • Avatar
      KCRocks3000 March 25, 2015 at 9:38 am #

      That and the top two cities for the past two years are there because they’re 2 of the 3 cities with Google Fiber.