Britbox

Jess’s Review of BritBox

The Basics

Thanks to a partnership with BBC and ITV, BritBox brings a wide selection of UK programming to American audiences. When you create an account and log in to BritBox, you’ll find TV shows and movies in several genres, including comedy, drama, mystery, documentary, and lifestyle. You can browse content by those genres, alphabetically, or by categories like Classics and Premiers.

The service, introduced in March 2017, is a recent addition to the services available to cord cutters, but an important one for those outside of the UK who want access to British TV. One goal for BritBox has been to bring British shows to the American audience as soon as possible, with some episodes becoming available the day after they air.

BritBox is only available in the U.S.

Supported Devices

All you need is an internet connection and a compatible device to get access to some of the best programming from the UK. Watch your favorite TV series, movies, documentaries, and more with BritBox on the following devices:

  • iPhone and Android
  • Tablet
  • Computer
  • Chromecast
  • Apple TV
  • Roku

Plans and Pricing

There is currently only one plan available for those want to watch British TV and movies with BritBox. The service offers a one week free trial, then a subscription will cost you $6.99/month.

BritBox can also be added onto an Amazon Prime Video subscription. Just like going directly through BritBox, adding the service to your Prime subscription costs $6.99/month after a one week free trial.

What to Watch

BritBox features content from the BBC and ITV. While delivering content from only two sources may not seem like much, the two networks air a ton of great TV shows and movies, including the majority of those that will be recognized by an American audience.

Look for current seasons of favorite British comedies and dramas. You can stay current on series like Coronation Street, Holby City, and EastEnders.

The Classics section offers past seasons of a wide variety of shows, split into genres for easy browsing. Revisit your favorite characters from Upstairs Downstairs (both the original series and the reboot), Fawlty Towers, Doctor Who, and The Office. Then, look into the archives to discover classic series you may have never been able to see before in the U.S.

A section called Our Favourites provides a curated collection from the company. This is where you’ll find hidden gems, lesser known appearances by your favorite actors, and binge worthy lists of episodes in interesting categories that are changed up frequently.

BritBox was designed to be an add-on services for both expats and those who have never lived across the pond, to watch their favorite British programming after cutting the cord. At only $6.99/month, it’s a great option for those who want to add some international content to their streaming options.

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27 Responses to Jess’s Review of BritBox

  1. Andy Munro December 18, 2017 at 12:10 pm #

    The FireTV channel is not as good as their free standing version, it lacks some of the programming.
    In my opinion it needs more programming choice and it needs to be updated more frequently. Who wants to watch the Festival of Remembrance from November when we’re almost at Christmas ?
    It needs to be more current in every way, as it really doesn’t change much from week to week, apart from updating soap operas. Talking of which, this is where Britbox excels, if you like British Soap, this is a must have, as you get the major three, Eastenders, Corrie and Emmerdale a day or two after they are broadcast in the UK.
    I would also like to see one of the UK’s daily news programmes like News at Ten or the Channel 4 News on a daily basis.
    Britbox are still comparatively new and I am sure they will improve. Both the BBC and ITV back catalogues are vast and should give them plenty of diverse programming to satisfy Anglophiles and Expat’s alike – but please add more choice, it’s too limited at the moment.
    Finally Cord Cutting tends to forget Acorn TV, much like Britbox they have loads of British programming, plus some great Australian, New Zealand and Canadian shows. They are only $4.95 a month, $2 cheaper than Britibox . Plus Acorn offer an annual membership which will save you another $10 over the year. This is an option I have requested from BritBox from day one, but they have yet to add it.
    Walter Presents and MHZ Choice also add a ‘Euro Noir’ touch, for people who enjoy a dose of subtitled Scandi drama, they are both great options and are available for most devices.
    To close, despite my criticism of Britbox, I am very happy to see more European and Worldwide programming available on streaming providers and look forward to them improving in 2018.

    • Sam Iamee December 18, 2017 at 2:57 pm #

      Regarding Walter Presents, I was intrigued when this launched, but the content seemed a bit slim. How is it now?

      • Andy Munro December 18, 2017 at 6:01 pm #

        Much better than it was and they add more every month. I’d give it another go.

    • SteveParadis December 18, 2017 at 6:08 pm #

      Speaking of MHZ, they also have a OTA presence on quite a few PBS subchannels.
      http://www.mhznetworks.org/mhz-worldview/carriage

    • PaperCoyote December 18, 2017 at 7:07 pm #

      Thanks for bringing up my three favorite services. I watch Acorn more than any other service I use. I also enjoy WP and MHz Choice. Some of the best programming around can be found on those three apps. For those that have Hulu and are interested in what MHz Choice has to offer go to networks and you will see MHz Networks they have a small sampling of what they offer (Beck, Wallander, A French Village and Spiral).

    • Darren Bratton December 18, 2017 at 8:37 pm #

      The only show I liked on Acorn was Birds of a Feather. I prefer Britbox with Corrie, Are You Being Served & Keeping Up Appearance, among others…. Maybe they should merge & charge one fee.

      • Andy Munro December 19, 2017 at 3:09 am #

        I think competition is always good, I think it actually helps keeps pricing down.

      • Andy Munro December 19, 2017 at 3:11 am #

        …Darren don’t forget Corrie is also back on Hulu these days. Just a week or so behind the UK and many more back episodes than on Britbox.

  2. Fred Koot December 18, 2017 at 12:50 pm #

    Big fan of British tv here, but don’t see much there to watch, that’s not already on Netflix/Hulu. On a side note these sites are getting hurt with people bring forced to have Amazon prime in order to access their content on Fire tv’s.

    • Andy Munro December 18, 2017 at 6:04 pm #

      I couldn’t agree more. It’s fine to offer them as Amazon Channels, but they should also be offered as stand alone apps on Fire TV. Plus quite often they have more programming on the stand alone app than when it’s offered on the Amazon Channels.

      • Darren Bratton December 18, 2017 at 8:31 pm #

        I keep telling them that Looking for Victoria still isn’t on their Amazon channel…to no avail….

        • Andy Munro December 19, 2017 at 2:28 am #

          I kept on and on at Britbox about this and they promised me to hang in there and that it would be resolved and that the various shows would be added, well they never were and in the end they blamed Amazon ! That was the end for me.

    • Darren Bratton December 18, 2017 at 8:38 pm #

      I used to watch the live Brit channels on FilmOn but I knew it wouldn’t last & that Roku would remove the channel(which it has).

  3. Barbara R December 18, 2017 at 1:18 pm #

    Who is Jess??

    • Andy Munro December 19, 2017 at 2:29 am #

      I think Jess works for Britbox !

  4. Darren Bratton December 18, 2017 at 6:34 pm #

    Don’t really see a ‘review’ here…you don’t really let us know what you think of the service, which is what a review would be….

    • Andy Munro December 18, 2017 at 8:13 pm #

      I hope my comment was more of a review Darren. I felt Jess’s article read more like an advertisement than a review. Just my opinion.

    • Manda December 18, 2017 at 11:39 pm #

      The title should be “Jess Copies the Britbox Promotional Info”

  5. Jack Astor December 18, 2017 at 7:39 pm #

    Why can’t we have access to the entire BBC and ITV library?

    Also why can’t I pay to legally watch BBC and ITV channels live?

    • Andy Munro December 18, 2017 at 8:12 pm #

      Use a DNS service for BBCiPayer and the ITV Hub. Many do this with no issues.

      • Barbara R December 19, 2017 at 3:23 am #

        There are legal issues surrounding this and while not everyone is caught, there can be repercussions.

        • Andy Munro December 19, 2017 at 4:35 am #

          Debatable. Especially if the person involved has dual residence and a fully paid ITV Hub Plus account , IPlayer account etc. I am of the belief that as long as the legitimate programme provider is being paid by the viewer, then surely that’s a whole lot better than illegally, downloading where actors and crew make zero money.

          • Barbara R December 19, 2017 at 8:54 am #

            I put my response above, instead of here,by error.

    • Barbara R December 19, 2017 at 3:20 am #

      Because they are British and ontrol their own international licensing deals. For example, thet license things to PBS and BBC America. That’s how they make money to produce their programs. International copyright law.

    • Barbara R December 19, 2017 at 3:35 am #

      Even Netflix has different libraries in different countries. International licensing is a major aspect of international copyright law, and is fiercely controlled and protected. “Intellectual property rights” is the relevant area of the law.

  6. Barbara R December 19, 2017 at 8:49 am #

    Your scenario about dual residency etc. covers a very narrow slic of people. Also, while your personal opinion about what is best is the way you feel, it has no relationship to what the law requires. These programs constitute intellectual property, and everybody connected with them have property rights that deserve to be enforced. Your views might change if you were an actor, singer, writer, etc., and your lifework was being stolen be people who just thought they should be able to have whatever they wanted, playing by their own rules.

    Jack wanted to know why he couldn’t legally pay to acc ss the whole library. The answer is that the law is set up differently, for reasons I touched on. I believe in the rule of law, and in the protection of intellectual property rights. I see no difference between breaking into someone’s house, stealing their wallet, hacking their bank account, or illegally streaming their works of art.

    Jack, of couse, wasn’t asking about stealing. But you came close to trying to justify it.

    • Andy Munro December 19, 2017 at 12:39 pm #

      Barbara, I do not support or justify piracy in any way and in no way do I endorse it. I have many friends in the business and I am totally against illegal downloads and I did not suggest that to Jack.
      I agree with Jack in that the BBC and ITV should have a legal means to view their property overseas, Britbox and BBC America etc have just a fraction of the programming available. That is why I suggested something like the paid version of ITV Hub, Sky NOWTV or something similar. Of course BBC programming should only be viewed by people with a TV license, which even in the UK itself, is becoming harder and harder to enforce. They need to have a paid subscription model, rather than the antiquated license which so many people dishonestly avoid.
      You inference whether intentional or not was that I was behaving like a thief, which is not the case. I pay a lot every month in monthly subscription fees to view a few countries programming, but I pay for it all directly to the official sources like ITV, Acorn etc and my dues help the actors, producers pay their bills. Please direct your angst where it is deserved, to those in the community who use Kodi Add Ons and the like.