NFL Sunday Ticket Is “Moving To A Streaming Service,” Says NFL Commissioner Rodger Goodell

NFL Sunday Ticket will be “moving to a streaming service,” according to NFL Commissioner Rodger Goodell during an interview with CNBC’s ‘Squawk on the Street’. While speaking about the future of the NFL’s out-of-market packages, the commissioner stated the following:

“I clearly believe we will be moving to a steaming service. I think that’s best for the consumers at this stage. We have so much interest right now and there is so much innovation around that and how we are going to be able to change how people watch football. I think that we’ll have some decision by the fall.”

This isn’t the first time that Goddell has commented on the Sunday Ticket’s streaming future. In October of 2021, ahead of the league’s current deal with DIRECTV expiring in 2023, the NFL head stated that he considers Sunday Ticket “a streaming product”.

The NFL hasn’t been quiet about its digital media strategy and the future of Sunday Ticket. Earlier this year, NFL Chief Media Business Officer Brian Rolapp expressed the importance of the digital shift in choosing the league’s partners by stating “the partners had the rights to drive streaming” so the league can reach as many viewers as possible. Goddell further elaborated on how the league values the transition to streaming and its goals:

“We really believe that these new platforms give us the ability to innovate beyond where we are today and make the experience for our consumers so much better. It obviously makes it more available to our consumers and particularly the younger demographic, which is one that we really want to get to. I think that this will make it more accessible for fans, I think it will be a better experience for fans, and we’re excited about it.”

 As the league continues to tackle the digital frontier, more games are available to stream. Goodell was questioned on how the league’s shift to streaming games on streamers (Paramount+, Peacock, Prime Video, ESPN+)  would impact linear TV ratings, ad dollars, and overall ratings:

“We think they’re different users. We think that the people who are watching on a streaming service aren’t watching on television so it’s adding to our audience, that’s really the focus we have.”

Like a play-action pass, the NFL is letting things develop to strengthen its relationship with viewers by getting games directly in their hands. An NFL+ direct-to-consumer streaming service is in the works, which could possibly include games, radio, podcasts, and team content. In April, it was reported that the owners were still discussing if all 32 teams would be available on the service, or if each team will have its own. Gooddell had this to say about the service:

“We think it’s very important to have a relationship directly with the consumer. We think we have a lot of content and a lot of ability to be able to do that. The consumers want it, and so we are very excited with what NFL+ is going to be. But it is really in an early stage, and I think over the years, you’ll see that continue to grow. It’ll be an important opportunity to speak with our fans directly.”

When asked when to expect NFL+, Gooddell stated that the “timing will be for this season, at least in the initial phase.” The service has been rumored to be $5 per month but Goddell didn’t give an update on pricing, stating “the details, we’ll wait and let you know in a few weeks.”